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Allium gooddingii
(Goodding’s onion)

[taxon report][distribution map][all photos][line drawing]



Family: Liliaceae

Scientific Name: Allium gooddingii Ownbey

Synonyms:

Vernacular Name: Goodding’s onion

R-E-D Code: 2-2-1

Description: Herbaceous perennial with 1-3 elongate bulbs terminating in a thick, iris-like rhizome; outer bulb coats veined with parallel, not net-like, persistent fibers; leaves obtuse, flat, strap-like 12-30 cm long, 8mm wide; flower stalk erect, longer than the leaves, up to 45 cm long; umbel persistent, erect, loose, 18-23-flowered; tepals erect, purplish-pink; flowers campanulate, 8-10 mm; pedicel 15-20 mm, elongating in fruit. Flowers from late June to early September.

Similar Species: Allium gooddingii is distinguished from other New Mexico Alliums by its broad, strap shaped leaves and its bulb coat of persistent parallel fibers. Two other Alliums may occur in the same habitats as A. gooddingii. Allium geyeri has a similar statue and flowers, but is lighter in color, is not rhizomatus, has bulbs with outer coats that are composed of net-like coarse-meshed fibrous cells, and has a broader habitat range. Allium cernuum has nodding flowers and scaly bulb coats.


Distribution: New Mexico: McKinley, San Juan, Lincoln and Catron counties; Arizona: Greenlee and Pima counties.

Habitat: The majority of plants occur at the base of steep slopes and moist drainage bottoms in the shade of spruce-fir and mixed conifer forest and aspen between 6,500 and 9400 ft. In the Lincoln National Forest Allium gooddingii is found above 10,000ft in open meadow areas, avalanche chutes and ski runs adjacent to spruce-fir forest.

Remarks: Over 90 % of known localities for Allium gooddingii occur in the Gila National Forest and the adjacent Apache – Sitgreaves NF in Arizona. The third largest population occurs on the Lincoln NF in NM. Over 90% of these populations and their habitats burned in three different wildfires from 2011 – 2012.

Conservation Considerations: Post-fire study results indicate that the species may survive direct impacts from fire but is unable to maintain itself when the habitat is completely altered by high intensity fires resulting in canopy removal. A Candidate Conservation Agreement between the USFWS and the USDA Forest Service was never implemented. Therefore little data is available about the status of the species pre-fires. Other threats include climate change, logging, and potentially grazing.

Important Literature (*Illustration):

*USDI Fish & Wildlife Service and USDA Forest Service, Southwest Region. 1997. Goodding’s Onion (Allium gooddingii); Conservation Assessment and Strategy.

Roth, D. 2016. Wildfire Impacts on Species of Concern Plants in the Gila National Forest, New Mexico. Unpublished report prepared by EMNRD-Forestry Division, Santa Fe, NM for the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Region 2, Albuquerque, NM. 48 pp.

Roth, D. 2016. Wildfire Impacts on Species of Concern Plants in the Lincoln National Forest, New Mexico. Unpublished report prepared by EMNRD-Forestry Division, Santa Fe, NM for the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Region 2, Albuquerque, NM. 28 pp.

Information Compiled By: Daniela Roth, 2016

Agency Status:
Taxon USFWS State of NM USFS BLM Navajo Nation Natural Heritage NM Global Rank
Allium gooddingii SoCESen.Gp 3S2G4


Photo credits in header Peniocereus greggii var. greggii © T. Todsen,
Lepidospartum burgessii © M. Howard, Argemone pleiacantha ssp. pinnatisecta © R. Sivinski
©2005 New Mexico Rare Plant Technical Council